Trick or Treat, Smell My Paws.. Nope.

If you had no idea what Halloween was ... .. a bunch of masked people come to your door, excited for yummy smelling forbidden sweets, loud creatures ringing your doorbell and what with the strange decorations ????? You would probably Nope right out of Halloween Festivities.

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Bad things happen to good pets on Halloween. Pets are often teased, tortured, terrorized and even killed at this time of year. Veterinary clinics also see a big rise in pet accidents and injuries on Halloween. The most common problems are poisoning, ingestion of foreign bodies, trauma from car accidents and bite wounds. It is always fun to see people with their pets dressed up and going door to door with the kids. We all know what to do to keep our children safe during the Halloween festivities but what about your pet? Click the links at the end of the story for more tips to keep your pet safe. The AVMA has listed 7 things to Make Halloween Safer for your pet.

  • Don't feed your pets Halloween candy, especially if it contains chocolate or xylitol (a common sugar substitute found in sugar-free candies and gum);
  • Make sure your pet is properly identified (microchip, collar and ID tag) in case s/he escapes through the open door while you're distracted with trick-or-treaters;
  • Keep lit candles and jack-o-lanterns out of reach of pets;
  • If you plan to put a costume on your pet, make sure it fits properly and is comfortable, doesn't have any pieces that can easily be chewed off, and doesn't interfere with your pet's sight, hearing, breathing, opening its mouth, or moving. Take time to get your pet accustomed to the costume before Halloween, and never leave your pet unsupervised while he/she is wearing a costume;
  • Keep glow sticks and glow jewelry away from your pets. Although the liquid in these products isn't likely toxic, it tastes really bad and makes pets salivate excessively and act strangely;
  • If your pet is wary of strangers or has a tendency to bite, put him/her in another room during trick-or-treating hours or provide him/her with a safe hiding place;
  • Keep your pet inside.

Also remember Popular Halloween plants such as pumpkins and decorative corn are considered to be relatively nontoxic, but they can produce stomach upset in pets who nibble on them. Decorations can kill! Wires and cords from electric lights and other decorations should be kept out of reach of your pets. If chewed, your pet might suffer cuts or burns, or receive a possibly life-threatening electrical shock.

American Veterinary Medical Association
ASPCA Haloween Safety